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Plan a vegetable garden now...it's cheaper!

posted Jul 28, 2010 19:53:58 by GetInTheGarden
In the midst of harvesting, canning, freezing and sharing the garden harvest my thoughts are already on next year's garden. The end of summer is a GREAT time to buy seeds on clearance that you can store in the fridge until next spring. Several local garden centers have seeds for 60%-70% off! An inexpensive way to start a garden!
Sowing, growing, harvesting and sharing. It's the garden way. :-)
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9 replies
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Carole said Jul 28, 2010 20:47:42
What a great idea, Lisa! What are you planning for next year?
Community hostess, wildlife gardener, avid birder, loves butterflies and all other critters. Find me on Twitter @CB4wildlife
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GetInTheGarden said Jul 29, 2010 01:34:33
I harvest and save seeds from heirloom vegetables etc. I grow, but end of year sales always give me a chance to try something new. I've found a few wildflower varieties to grow near our pond, several squash, tomato and herb seeds as well. My favorite for next year are the melon seeds that were developed just three towns away from where I now live. I've had so-so luck with growing melons so I'm VERY excited to try a local heirloom next year!
Sowing, growing, harvesting and sharing. It's the garden way. :-)
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Suburban_Farmer said Jul 29, 2010 16:23:23
I'm with you, Lisa, I like to save some of my own seeds and keep my eyes open for good deals on seeds for next year's bounty. Of course, one of my favorite things to do is *plan* for all the possibilities for next year. I love sitting in a comfy chair with a big cup of tea (this is one of those moments where I forgo coffee for tea) and perusing all of my seed catalogs, book, and magazines.

I love trying new things as well as figuring out where I can squeeze it in!
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GetInTheGarden said Jul 29, 2010 17:53:50
I think that's the fun of finding the seeds inexpensively (or trading!) I can grow a few of many varieties and really observe which grow best in my garden. Saves money in the long run, and who doesn't want to trial a few plants in their own space??? Looking for local heirlooms is a bit like treasure hunting!
Sowing, growing, harvesting and sharing. It's the garden way. :-)
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Carole said Jul 29, 2010 20:05:24
LOl you two crack me up! Confession time: I have one lonely heirloom yellow beefsteak tomato, one heirloom cherry tomato, and five basil plants for me. I do have some salvias, but they are for the hummingbirds.

Every other square inch is packed with butterfly and bird attractors. I do pore over catalogs--of native plants--so that part I'm down with.

I have a very tiny yard, which unfortunately is shaded by my neighbor's nasty Norway Maples, so there's just not a lot of room.

I'll get my veggie fix vicariously through you.
Community hostess, wildlife gardener, avid birder, loves butterflies and all other critters. Find me on Twitter @CB4wildlife
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GetInTheGarden said Aug 04, 2010 21:49:25
Oh Chris... I think Carole is perfect for a window box vegetable garden! A few beans, a cucumber, maybe a dwarf pepper plant... vegetables flowers feed the pollinators, too! LOL!
Sowing, growing, harvesting and sharing. It's the garden way. :-)
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Carole said Aug 04, 2010 21:58:08
Maybe I could squeeze a small container garden on my deck. I'll have to go get some seeds so I can be ready to roll next year.
Community hostess, wildlife gardener, avid birder, loves butterflies and all other critters. Find me on Twitter @CB4wildlife
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UrsulaV said Aug 10, 2010 17:20:48
Don't feel bad, Carole--you pretty much described my vegetable garden there too! I've got a roma tomato, a bunch of basil, some chives and some dill. For awhile I grew peppers in pots for my partner, but then he came down with something that makes spicy food off-limits, so that went by the wayside.

And then there's the cantaloupe...I planted three last year, and discovered that the window between "unripe" and "overripe, rotten and filled with bugs" lasts about thirty seconds. Never got an edible fruit out of it. But it volunteered in the garden this year and I didn't have the heart to kill it at first...and now I don't think I have the CAPACITY to kill it. It's climbed up onto the deck and is eating the deck chairs. I am afraid...
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Carole said Aug 10, 2010 19:24:57
LOL, the cantaloupe that took over the world! Sounds like one of those old scary movies. That giant tomato movie comes to mind....
Community hostess, wildlife gardener, avid birder, loves butterflies and all other critters. Find me on Twitter @CB4wildlife
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